History of Scholarly Communication

History of Scholarly Communication

According to Joe Janes, a faculty member at the Information School, University of Washington, scholarly communication began with the journal Philosophical Transactions. It was established in 1665, making it the first journal in the world exclusively devoted to science. ("Philosophical" in the title means natural science, according to 17th century practice). Today we may be at the threshold of the greatest change in scholarly communication and knowledge transfer that the world has ever seen or experienced, including the innovation of Gutenberg's printing press.

One of the developments that has greatly aided scholarly communication is the Open Access movement. Open Access refers to online research that is free of all access restrictions and free of many copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access to information has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

International Open Access Week, a global event now celebrating its twelfth year, is an opportunity for the academic and research community to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in making Open Access a norm in scholarship and research. This year Open Access week is Oct. 23 - 29. Stay tuned for more information about this event.

- Posted September 21, 2017 by Kathy DeMey (5:05 PM)